Archives for posts with tag: Unnatural Causes

From Unnatural Causes:

Job loss doesn’t just affect individuals. It impacts families and even whole communities. Stress, uncertainty, and lost income affect children in various ways.

This video is a Web-exclusive supplement to “Not Just a Paycheck,” Episode 7 of “UNNATURAL CAUSES: Is Inequality Making Us Sick?” This ground-breaking documentary series looks at how the social, economic and physical environments in which we are born, live, and work profoundly affect our longevity and health.

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From Unnatural Causes – Episode 2:

When Atlanta lawyer Kim Anderson was pregnant with her first child, she did everything right: she ate a healthy diet, exercised, and got the best prenatal care. But her baby was born almost three months premature. This excerpt . . . explores racism’s impact on pregnancy outcomes.

 

 

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From Unnatural Causes (Episode 5 – Place Matters):

Community activist Torm Nompraseurt leads a “toxic tour” of Richmond, California where high levels of industrial pollution are wreaking havoc on the health and wellbeing of residents.

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From Unnatural Causes:

Eboni Cochran and her neighbors in Louisville have organized to demand that chemical companies in their area do a better job of monitoring and containing hazardous materials that seep into the soil and air. Across the country, polluting industries are concentrated in communities where the poor and people of color live.

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From Unnatural CausesEpisode 5:

Why is your street address such a good predictor of your health? Increasingly, Southeast Asian immigrants like Gwai Boonkeut are moving into neglected urban neighborhoods where African Americans have long suffered, and now their health is being eroded too. What can be done to create a neighborhood that promotes rather than destroys health?

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Unnatural Causes – Episode 1

UNNATURAL CAUSES criss-crosses the country investigating the stories and findings that are shaking up conventional notions about what makes us healthy or sick. It turns out there’s much more to our well-being than genes, behaviors and medical care. The social, economic, and physical environments in which we are born, live and work profoundly affect our longevity and health – as much as smoking, diet and exercise.

The series sheds light on mounting evidence of how lack of access to power and resources can get under the skin and disrupt human biology as surely as germs and viruses. It also reveals a health gradient tied to wealth: those at the top of the class pyramid average longer, healthier lives, while those at the bottom are the most disempowered, get sicker more often and die sooner. Most of us fall somewhere in between.

What’s more, at every level, many communities of color are worse off than their white counterparts. Researchers believe that chronic stress over the life course may create an additional health burden for people of color.

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Unnatural Causes

Mary Turner . . . lives in a poor neighborhood of Louisville, KY. With three teenage children, a husband on disability, and health complications that prevent her from working, Mary must budget carefully to keep her family fed and housed. In this video, she discusses the choices she faces every day, quickly but eloquently presenting a glimpse of one woman’s life at the lower end of the U.S. socio-economic spectrum. From the UNNATURAL CAUSES series: Episode 1 – “In Sickness and In Wealth.”

From Documentary Website:

UNNATURAL CAUSES is the acclaimed documentary series broadcast by PBS and now used by thousands of organizations around the country to tackle the root causes of our alarming socio-economic and racial inequities in health.

The four-hour series crisscrosses the nation uncovering startling new findings that suggest there is much more to our health than bad habits, health care, or unlucky genes. The social circumstances in which we are born, live, and work can actually get under our skin and disrupt our physiology as much as germs and viruses.

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