From the Myrtle Beach Sun News: Mutant fish: A puzzle in the water (by Claudia Lauer, September 29):

Longtime Bucksport residents know every curve in the dirt road leading to the Bull Creek boat landing.

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Fishing and wading in the muddy waters is almost second nature for generations of residents who grew up as river folks, but something in the creek is starting to worry some residents.

A U.S. Geological Survey study released in September 2009 reported that 90 percent of the largemouth bass pulled from the creek during the study had male and were developing female reproductive cells. A year after the study was finished, residents still have questions about the effects of the fish on people and whether something in the water — the same water filtered for drinking water for many Horry County residents — is causing what biologists call endocrine disruption, which makes reproduction for the fish more difficult.

The problem is not confined to Bull Creek, but the Pee Dee Basin had the highest incidence of intersex fish in the study. The study looked at river basins all over the country and found that about half of them had some instances of intersex fish. The only river basin examined that didn’t show any problems was Alaska’s Yukon River Basin. In parts of the Mississippi River in Minnesota and the Yampa River in Colorado, 70 percent of the smallmouth bass had female signs. Scientists and residents say more research must be done to determine which of the many possible environmental contaminants to the water may be causing the issue in the fish and whether it’s something being done locally or upstream.

Steve Howell, like many of the lifelong residents, feels some ownership in the creek that he, his family and his friends have fished for generations.

“What about taking baths, drinking the water, cooking and etc. with the water from your tap that is coming straight out of the same river that is highly contaminated that it is screwing the fish up?” Howell said. “Since it is affecting the fish in such drastic ways as this, then what is it going to do to humans over a period of time, and why isn’t anyone or any group doing a study to try and find out?”

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A number of contaminants have been suspected as the cause of the endocrine disruption. Researchers are studying the effects of livestock farming, of industrial chemicals, and of hormones and other chemicals that find their way into waste water. Hormones and birth control pills have become more commonplace and leave the human body in our waste.

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Howell said he plans to continue fishing in the creek, but he’s wary of what the long-term effects could be.

“You want to know what is happening because if the water is doing that to the fish, then what happens to us?” he said. “What happens to women who are pregnant or babies that aren’t born yet? You want to know what they’re doing to make sure we’re safe and whether there’s more happening other than here’s this study and we don’t know why it’s happening or what it means.”

Read the entire article here.

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