Archives for the day of: November 12, 2010

Inter Press Service: Black Floridians await settlement on toxic contamination.

For close to four decades, residents of Tallevast in southwest Florida lived side by side with the American Beryllium Company, which employed local men and women to manufacture parts for nuclear weapons. Each day, workers inhaled beryllium dust and brought it home on their clothing. * * * Unbeknownst to Tallevast residents, toxic chemicals used in the plant, including dioxin and TCE, were seeping into the ground. By the time local regulators investigated, a poisonous plume had spread across 200 acres below the small historically Black town.  The plant was sold to defence contractor Lockheed Martin in 1996, and the leakage was discovered as the company prepared to sell the property in 2000. The state of Florida and Manatee County officials were notified but the problem was hidden from residents. State officials quietly began removing soil until a resident questioned their actions. In late 2003 information was finally released on the groundwater contamination.  Only then did the truth of this environmental nightmare begin to come to light. By this time, nearly one person in every household had been diagnosed with a type of cancer, and many people were dying very young. More . . .

Huntsville WAFF: Inside the gate. Redstone Arsenal was a hub for chemical weapons in the 1940’s.

Three separate military facilities produced weapons like mustard gas and lewisite. After World War II came DDT and rocket fuel. Much of that toxic waste still remains. . . . Much of that toxic waste remains 24 years after the Environmental Protection Agency issued its first clean-up permit. A look into the EPA’s file on Redstone shows lots of studies on individual toxic waste sites, but there aren’t nearly as many clean-up operations. Of the 474 clean-up sites, by the Arsenal’s count, 94 are complete. That’s less than 20% of the contaminated sites. More . . .

Charlotte Observer: Calendar exposes cases of breast cancer in men at Camp Lejeune.

Thirteen men who suffer from breast cancer appear in a new calendar. All served or lived on the Marine base at Camp Lejeune. All believe their cancer can be traced to the decades in which drinking water contaminated with benzene, TCE, and other poisons poured from the base’s taps. More . . .

 

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