Reuters: Metal pollution tied to Parkinson’s disease.

People living near a steel factory or another source of high manganese emissions are at higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, suggests a new study. As many as one million Americans live with the degenerative disease, according to the Parkinson’s Disease Foundation. Pesticides from farms have long been suspected of upping the chances of developing Parkinson’s, but much less is known about the influences of city living. * * * So Racette and his colleagues analyzed data on about five million Medicare beneficiaries who hadn’t moved between counties from 1995 to 2003. Then they compared Parkinson’s rates to industry emissions of copper, lead and manganese obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency. By 2003, less than one percent of people in urban areas developed Parkinson’s disease. In counties with little or no release of the metals, 274 out of every 100,000 people had the disease, compared to 489 in counties with high manganese levels. More . . .

Louisville Courier-Journal: Beware what’s in the air: Pollution may raise your heart disease risks.

The American Heart Association released a scientific statement on heart disease and air pollution earlier this year. A team of researchers from the University of Louisville and Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, published a paper on the topic recently as well.Both bring attention to a type of air pollution called fine airborne particulate matter, such as PM2.5, that’s generated by various sources, including individuals and industries. “Fine particles are really one of the biggest health threats among the pollutants,” said Lauren Anderson, executive director of the Louisville Metro Air Pollution Control District.They penetrate deep in the lungs, “can be present pretty much anytime,” and can result from common activities, such as driving around the city, she said. More . . .

Advertisements